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Milk replacers LP system

Printed From: Dairy Science and Food Technology
Category: Manufacture of LP-containing milk replacers
Forum Name: LP containing milk replacers
Forum Description: How do you produce milk powders containing high levels of LP activity, how is antimicrobiial activity measured?
URL: https://www.dairyscience.info/forum/forum_posts.asp?TID=109
Printed Date: 22 Apr 2024 at 1:36am
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Topic: Milk replacers LP system
Posted By: Guests
Subject: Milk replacers LP system
Date Posted: 20 Mar 2010 at 3:46pm
Hello,

Can anyone advise if there are comercial suppliers of milk replacers that contain the LP system?

I would be very thankful for any help.

Thanks

Khenal.



Replies:
Posted By: Guests
Date Posted: 20 Mar 2010 at 3:46pm
The Email notification of posts has stopped working so just noted your post. I will respond over the next day or so.

Mike


Posted By: Guests
Date Posted: 20 Mar 2010 at 3:47pm
Many thanks.


Posted By: Guests
Date Posted: 20 Mar 2010 at 3:47pm
To the best of my knowledge that are no commercial suppliers of milk replacers containing an active lactoperoxidase system. However there are commercial milk replacers that when supplemented with an enzyme source and a source of H2O2 will function satisfactorily.


Posted By: Guests
Date Posted: 20 Mar 2010 at 3:47pm
Hi Michael,

Thanks a lot for the imput, an enzyme source - are these available commercially - lactoferrin/lactoperoxidase? Would you know who supplies?

Many thanks again.


Posted By: Guests
Date Posted: 20 Mar 2010 at 3:48pm
Yes there are a number of companies that can supply lactoperoxidase/lactoferrin in kg quantities.

However one would only add purified LP to milk for use in animal milk replacers for research purposes. It would make more commercial sense to produce low heat skim milk powder, which is relatively easy to do, providing high quality milk concentrate is available- free from enterococci for example. It is relatively easy to produce SMP of high LP concentration.

I regret that I am not prepared to endorse commercial suppliers of LP or lactoferrin in the forum. However if you Email me at webmaster at dairyscience.info and put your interest in context I will try to help.


Posted By: Guests
Date Posted: 20 Mar 2010 at 3:48pm
Noted this series of posts & reference to lactoferrin on index page. Interesting. Might there be issues with products from some manufacturers?


Posted By: Guests
Date Posted: 20 Mar 2010 at 3:48pm
I note your question. I cannot respond directly. However the response below may be of some help.

Buyers need purchase specifications prior to discussing their needs with suppliers.

They will also need to test that product supplied meets these specifications. Many manufacturers have limited scientific support and testing facilities and some rely on third party test facilities. This is fine until there are problems!

Specifications will be different for particular LP/lactoferrin uses e.g. the requirements for use in human baby food will be different than in an animal oral care product. Some suppliers will be able to meet particular specifications and others may not produce the particular grade required. Companies need to have technical people employed or available to them to specify their needs

Because antimicrobial proteins are heat sensitive and there is limited scope to heat the end product during protein incorporation, the microbiological quality of the purchased protein is particularly important. This is much more sophisticated than simply requiring that particular pathogens are not present, e.g. VRE. Test methods are important and fairly large quantities of product may need to be sampled. Consideration needs to be given to heat tolerant emerging pathogens (or potential pathogens) and the absence of toxins.

I have touched on the need to understand the biological activity of antimicrobial proteins elsewhere. With lactoferrin for example this is more than its solubility or iron content although these are important.

The information available from some manufacturers, partly for commercial reasons, is limited and may be difficult for potential purchasers to evaluate.

Regretfully it would not be appropriate to continue this discussion further so please no further queries re manufacturers.



Posted By: Guests
Date Posted: 20 Mar 2010 at 3:48pm
Interesting web site good content. I would welcome discussion on a bact spec for using LF in a human feeding trial. TIA


Posted By: Guests
Date Posted: 20 Mar 2010 at 3:49pm
I have said a lot about this already. You need to identify the pathogens that are of particular concern to you. Ensure that the supplier has an appropriate HACCP system in place with rigorous environmental testing. End product testing cannot be used to confirm product safety although confirmation that that there is <1 pathogen in several hundred grams of product may help you get to sleep at night.

Taking 10 x 25 grams of sample and getting negative results for a pathogen does not mean that you can say there is <1 CFU pathogen in 250 grams of product! It is not safe to relate the concentration of pathogen in the sample you tested to the complete batch without some awareness of the statistics involved. Sampling statistics and the distribution of the pathogen in the product must be considered. Assuming a log-normal distribution, negative results from 10 samples each of 25 grams indicates that there is a probability (95%) of there being <1 pathogen in 83 grams (ICMSF Case 10). This is less reassuring than being able to say <1 pathogen in 250 grams. Similarly you must be cautious in interpreting what "not detected" in say 1 gram, 5 grams, 50 grams or other weight of product means.




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